Archive | July, 2015

Don’t Turn Content Into This Generation’s Banner Ads

Four Key Strategies for Brands When Creating Content

Our industry has finally woken up to the power of content marketing. According to eMarketer, 59% of marketers plan to increase their investment in content marketing. Not surprisingly, there’s a cottage industry growing to help brands cheaply and easily create content. From distribution to measurement, there seems to be a new tool popping up every day.

Personally, I’m getting nasty flashbacks to the early days of banner ads. When banner ads first came out, the marketing industry treated them like rebranded laundry detergent — “new and improved!” So, we shifted a bunch of dollars online and used half-baked data to prove it worked. Until, of course, we realized it didn’t.

The reason banners didn’t fulfill their promise isn’t that they were completely flawed. It’s because we didn’t look at them from a strategic standpoint. We didn’t understand their role, how to measure them or how to optimize them.

The same will be true of content if we don’t apply the lessons we learned. If we simply develop content because we think it’s new, improved, quicker and easier than previous tactics, we’re doomed to get the same disappointing results that we got from banner ads. We can’t simply create content to offset the fact that interruptive advertising is being avoided at an unprecedented rate. Content is not a panacea. It needs a strategic foundation. Here are four key action items to keep in mind when creating content:

To Read Full Post: Click Here

Read full storyComments Off on Don’t Turn Content Into This Generation’s Banner Ads

Your Focus on Benefits Won’t Benefit Your Brand

Shy Away From Abstraction and Stick to Concrete Features

Marketing is frustrating because virtually all common-sense ideas are wrong. Take Theodore Levitt’s famous maxim, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole!”

True perhaps. But that seduces marketing people into promoting better holes when they should be promoting better drills.

Should you promote the benefit of your brand (the hole) or the feature (the drill)? Logic suggests you should promote the benefit, the hole. Because, as Ted Levitt said, “People don’t want a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole.”

Taste versus broiling
“Taste is king” is Burger King’s latest slogan. But how many consumers are going to think, “Let’s go to Burger King because the burgers taste better?”

Very few.

On the other hand, Burger King was extremely successful with previous advertising campaigns using the theme, “broiling, not frying.” Consumers thought, “Burger King hamburgers must taste better because they are broiled and McDonald’s hamburgers are fried.”

Why promote features when consumers want benefits? Because “benefits” alone have little or no credibility.

To Read Full Post: Click Here

Read full storyComments Off on Your Focus on Benefits Won’t Benefit Your Brand